Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2020

So happy to announce that my first academic article on the Hindu tradition has been published masha’Allah. It is entitled “Dharma of Bhakti, Dharma of Mlecchas: Muslim Engagement with Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇavism as a Living Tradition” and is available in the latest issue of the Journal of Dharma Studies. For those interested in academic articles, you can get it through your university library, from my academia.edu page, or I can send you the pdf.

Here is the basic argument: Beginning with al-Birūnī (a classical Muslim scholar who died around the year 1048), Muslims have written studies of the Hindu tradition. However, they have not covered all Hindu schools of thought, and contemporary Muslim scholars must continue to engage with these schools of thought as living traditions. One such tradition that has not received enough scholarly attention is the Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇava tradition, which emerged in Bengal app. 500 years ago. Muslims were the political rulers at the time, and the Gauḍīya tradition incorporated Muslims into their theological framework. For example, the image on this post is of the famous encounter between Caitanya (the “founder” of the Gauḍīya tradition), and the local Muslim judge who is known in their sacred literature as “Chand Kazi.” In addition, Caitanya opened his movement to all peoples, including those who were Muslim by birth. Due to the preaching efforts of a traditional guru from this tradition, A.C. Bhaktivedanta Swami, the Gauḍīya tradition became a global tradition in the latter half of the 20th century. As such, 21st century Muslims need to understand Gauḍīya Vaiṣṇavism as a global religious tradition that aspires to universality just as the Islamic and Christian traditions do. Other points are made as well, particularly in regards to the methodology of interreligious scholarship, but I will leave that for those who want to read the full article.

Feel free to ask any questions, I will try my best to respond in a timely fashion insha’Allah. May Allah accept. āmīn.

unnamed

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: