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People often ask about how to develop a culture of Azadari (mourning commemorations for Imam Husayn) in the English language.

The short answer is that it is a work in progress, and it takes all of us trying out different things, and sharing with each other.

I have written one song to be used in majalis. I know it is not perfect. But I hope by sharing it someone with more talent than myself might improve upon it. Anyone has my permission to recite it without attribution. There is a video at the bottom that demonstrates how I have recited it, but no one should feel that they have to recite it that way. I provide it simply as an example.

Here are the lyrics:

Ameeri Husayn wa ni’ma’l-ameer
Commander Husayn, my allegiance is clear

Standing on this plane
Preparing to die
I have no more questions
No reason to ask why
Your house is my life
My sword is for you
I am ready to do
whatever you want me to

Ameeri Husayn wa ni’ma’l-ameer
Commander Husayn, my allegiance is clear

All of this life
Is for your one breath
All of these men
Will defend you til death
Now the time has come
To stand in front of you
My body is a shield
Just as God wants me to

Ameeri Husayn wa ni’ma’l-ameer
Commander Husayn, my allegiance is clear

This blood in my eyes
Makes it hard to see
I think that is you
Who is looking down on me
I would give my life again
For the son of Fatima
al-salam ‘alayk
Ya Aba Abdillah

Ameeri Husayn wa ni’ma’l-ameer
Commander Husayn, my allegiance is clear

[here is a video I made to accompany these lyrics]

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Unexpectedly, I am brought back to reflect on how this blog began 10 years ago. March 2008 to March 2018.

I don’t think anyone knows that the name of this blog, “A Mercy Case,” came from the Hindu story of Jagai and Madhai. In short, two sinful guys (Jagai and Madhai) throw an earthen pot at a religious person named Nityananda, causing his face to bleed. Nityananda’s spiritual master, Chaitanya, is about to kill them in response, but Nityananda intercedes and they are spared. Moved by this act of compassion, Jagai and Madhai reform their lives and follow the teachings of Chaitanya.

Back in March 2008 (when this blog began), a Hindu friend described the incident of Jagai and Madhai as “a mercy case,” and that was my inspiration.

jagaimadhai2

In my very first post, I alluded to this:

Guidance can sometimes come from the most unexpected of places. The inspiration to write came from a chance encounter a week ago, and the title of this endeavor came from a phrase used by a friend of mine who is not a Muslim. Wherever we turn, God is there, no matter how often we forget.

The same Truth still holds today.

I have lived the last 10 years in the tension between believing that God is guiding me and admitting the possibility that I am in a state of delusion. The atheist surely believes I am deluded, whereas a Hindu might consider me to be more or less going in the right direction, but with some serious modifications to be made if I want to succeed at the moment of my death. But the most important thing to me is that, if you have lived life through my eyes, then God is surely real and in whom else can I possibly hope except the One who is with me wherever I am. And I can not live life through any eyes but my own, as much as I may wish I were able to experience existence the way millions of others do. Only God can do that.

لَّا تُدْرِكُهُ الْأَبْصَارُ وَهُوَ يُدْرِكُ الْأَبْصَارَ وَهُوَ اللَّطِيفُ الْخَبِيرُ

No vision can take Him in, but He takes in all vision. He is the All Subtle, the All Aware.

Over the last 10 years, these posts have contained many many quotes. It is inevitable that our religious ideas are formed by the ideas of others. And so I want to share a quote (see video below) on this special occasion that describes my experience of faith probably better than anything else. Maybe in the next ten years faith will mean something different to me than it does now, but I do not know my future. All I know is my present and what I can remember of the past. It is no surprise to me that this quote comes from Hamza Yusuf, one of my teachers and someone who has had a lasting impact on thousands if not millions. Whenever I speak with him, I am reminded that we are both searchers.

Almost without a doubt, 10 years from now some of us will not be here. Only God knows. Best to keep on doing our best, worshiping our Lord until certainty comes.

May the Most Merciful of those who show mercy lead us all into Eternal Mercy, ameen.

 

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